Friday, September 27, 2013

Building a greenhouse in just over a minute? No worries!

Thanks must go to the funny, hardworking, co-operative, helpful and truly AWESOME people who made time to come and help us build our greenhouse a couple of weeks back.

Watch our time-lapse video of the build. It's pretty cool.
(Thanks to Phil for working out how to do the time-lapse bit) 


Of course it wouldn't have happened in the first place without the financial support we received from Landcare as part of our Be Natural Grant as well as the funds from our Moreland City Council Partnership grant.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Communal Crew Early Spring Planting - This Saturday (21st) from 9am-ish to12pm-ish

What is it ?

This Saturday the Communal Crew will be starting the rejuvenation of some of our late summer and autumn plantings. We have some donated seedlings from CERES (lettuce) as well as some additional seedlings we plan to buy

As wells as planting there is some maintenance and watering to do and if anyone is interested in starting on signage or discussing seed saving we can get cracking with that too.

All invited

Whoever you are in WB Gardens, whether your a plot holder, composter or food forest fanatic you can help too if you fancy some light activity and stimulating conversation on Saturday. If you are not currently part of WB Gardens come along anyway and enquire with us about joining up, if you are interested.

Just reply to this post if you plan to drop by.

Hope to see you Saturday. The Communal Crew.


Friday, September 13, 2013

Special Celebratory September Garden & Gather - Sunday 22nd September from 11am

In August last year we ran a tour of other Moreland community gardens to get our cogs turning on ideas of how our garden could be. It's been an amazing year since then and we've all worked pretty hard to get the garden to where it is.

July 2012
There's one thing that I reckon we haven't done well enough during the last year - CELEBRATE - and we're going to start to address this deficiency at our Garden & Gather on Sunday 22nd starting at 11am.

If you're one of the over 100 people who've had a hand in getting the garden to where it is we want to see you. Come and see what you've helped to build and say hello, have a bite to eat and a drink.

August 2013
We've got a few little jobs to take care of but then we're tipping the balance in favour of fun, interesting, relaxing and social with some workshops, live music and an extended lunch.

First the fun stuff:

  • 11.30am - a fruit tree training primer
  • 12.00pm - a compost workshop
  • 12.30pm - make milk bottle butterflies to scare away the cabbage butterflies
  • 1.00pm - Lunch! We're even going to see what we can drum up from what's ready to eat in the garden
Bring your friends/family/kids, some food to share and if you want a glass of wine or a few beers bring them too.

If you want to make some butterflies bring a plastic milk bottle and some scissors.

(Oh and the jobs: finishing the pruning of the fruit trees around the fence; reorganising the North East corner of the northern communal garden bed.)

We promise to do a better job of addressing the celebration side of things.

See you down there!

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

This Sunday: Greenhouse Building a few more hands might be...well handy

Perhaps you saw that this Sunday a few of us will be assembling our new greenhouse?

We've got 5-6 of us lined up but could do with 2-3 more people for the day to really make a big start and hopefully knock it all off in a day.

We'll be kicking off at 9am and would love to see you down there.

Can you help? If you can drop us an email at grow.eat.moreland@gmail.com and let us know.

Sunday, September 8, 2013

What to sow or plant in September

Really feels like Spring now, doesn't it? The Community Garden and the Food Forest are looking spectacular.

It's hard to know, nowadays, whether to expect more frosts or wild weather. But let's play it safe and assume this will be a normal spring with plenty of wind, hopefully a bit of rain, and more of these lovely warm days.

It's a busy time. Winter veggies that have finished or bolted can come out (let's face it, if they look daggy and caterpillar-infested, you'll feel a whole lot better when they're in the compost). Weeds are popping up everywhere so dig them out while they're little. They won't know what's hit them. Then you can look forward to the next crop.

Spuds have been available in many nurseries for a while now - perhaps you've already got yours in. If not, look for virus-free seed potatoes which come in a huge range of different options so you can choose your favourite potatoey goodness, or perhaps experiment with a few different varieties. Here's one way to get a bumper crop. Simply choose a bit of ground that's not too weedy. Slash or mow the grass, if there is any. Then spread out a good thick layer of newspaper, and plonk your seed spuds on it with plenty of space between them. Cover them all in a thick layer of pea straw or lucerne hay, and then cover that with a layer of compost or rotted manure. As the plants come up and get bushier, layer more straw around them to keep the light from reaching the tubers. Then when they're ready to harvest (after the plants turn yellow), all you have to do is lift the straw and there they'll be. Magic. This is a great use of ground that has been neglected for a while, or that you'd like to turn into a garden bed for the future. You can use the same method in hessian bags or those polystyrene boxes from the fruit shop (punch a few holes through for drainage) or even a cylinder of chicken wire - so long as you can layer the straw and compost, and keep the light from turning the potatoes green and evil. Good luck!

There are stacks of other things you can sow or plant now:


  • Artichoke
  • Broccoli
  • Beetroot
  • Bok choy
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower 
  • Celery
  • Carrots
  • Endive
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Onions (late - try good keepers like Australian Brown)
  • Parsnips
  • Peas
  • Rocket
  • Silverbeet or rainbow chard
  • Spinach
  • Spring onions
  • Swedes
  • Turnips.



Traditionally, we plant our tomato seedlings around Cup weekend, to make sure all danger of frost has passed and provide them with a warm start to life. But if you're growing from seed in a nice protected spot or under glass, you can get them started in punnets now and plant them out later on. The same goes for basil, cucumber, eggplants,  pumpkin, zucchini, squash and even sweetcorn. It's also a great time to divide or plant rhubarb, and to sprinkle around seeds of coriander and parsley.

Lots to do. If you have any planting suggestions or tips, or fabulous recipes for our harvest, do let us know. Happy gardening!

PERMABLITZ #149: WEST BRUNSWICK - chicken yard/shed, wicking beds, fruit trees and more (Saturday 21st Sept)

If you came along to the Food Forest Permablitz, you've seen how much a motivated bunch of gardeners can get done in a day.

Now, that was not your "conventional" Permablitz though (is there really such a thing), typically they take place in someone's backyard. One of our very active members (Thomas, who hooked us up with the Permablitz crew, designed our compost palace and has run a few compost workshops) is completely renovating his backyard.  Read on for details...

PERMABLITZ #149: WEST BRUNSWICK 
Saturday 21 September 2013, 10:00am - 5:00pm

We're blitzing our north facing back garden, and if all goes according to plan, we'll:

  • build a fox (and dog) proof deep mulch chicken yard
  • cut down a couple of trees, and use the wood for huglekulture beds
  • construct a few wicking beds out of old apple crates
  • do plenty of digging to remove lead contaminated soil, put in mulch paths, and take measures to preserve water
  • plant orange, pear and banana trees, grape vines, potatoes, veggies, and herbs
  • build a pergola for the grape vines, to shade the house
  • build a chook shed
  • smash up some concrete, and replace it with mulch and ground beds
  • eat a fabulous vegetarian lunch

There’ll be workshops on the things we’re doing during the day, and perhaps others such as composting, pruning, wormfarming, and keeping chooks.  There will also be one on Lacto Bacillus from Ben (see this site, if that doesn't mean anything to you: http://gilcarandang.com/recipes/lactobacillus-serum/)

If you want to come, email Thomas_Greig@gardener.com, and we’ll reply with the address.  Let us know if you have any dietary requirements when you write.

IMPORTANT
If you haven't heard back after three days, please check your spam folder.
Please wear sensible shoes or boots, and bring gloves and a sunhat.

Sunday, September 1, 2013

Midweek Gardening Meet Ups: Tuesday and Friday 10am - 12pm - starting this week

Do you fancy a bit of gardening in company through the week? Are you at a bit of a loss in the garden on what to do? Or do you have heaps to do but would rather have company when gardening? Maybe you’re just looking to get outside and see other people?

Maybe our new midweek meet up is for you.

Starting this week, on Tuesdays from 10-12noon and Fridays from 10-12noon there will be an informal meet up at the garden. It will be a nice chance to garden together, have a cuppa, share some stories or knowledge and enjoy the beautiful space we've created. Starting in September.

Everyone (including kids) welcome, come down and enjoy. See you down there!


*Weather dependant – pouring rain and howling gales (or even a bit rainy) are not everyone’s ideal gardening weather. :)

Welcome to Moreland Community Gardening


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We're working together for a vibrant, sustainable network of community gardening locations in Moreland.

Our a 100% volunteer-based non-profit community group currently manages two community gardens in West Brunswick and Pentridge a food forest (also in West Brunswick).

Stop and think for 1 minute and you'll come up with at least one good reason for having community gardens all over the place. In case you don't have a minute or need some help, here are our top five!
  1. To bring people together.
  2. To hold on to Moreland's character and gardening knowledge.
  3. To provide somewhere where people can do some physical activity, relax and enjoy themselves
  4. To encourage sustainable gardening
  5. To make it easy for people to get hold of healthy locally grown food